The Beaumont Blog Has Moved!

 

beaumont blog has moved

The Beaumont Health System blog has moved to a new address: blog.beaumont.edu. We’ll continue to publish the articles you’ve come to enjoy, along with new and improved features and content throughout the months.

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Detroit Skating Club | Olympic Figure Skaters and Beaumont Sports Therapy

by Alex Patterson Tichy, Beaumont physical therapist, DPT, Detroit Skating Club

Detroit Skating ClubIf you’ve been watching any of the figure skating events in the 2014 Sochi Olympics, you’ve probably heard the announcers mention the Detroit Skating Club on more than a handful of occasions. The Detroit Skating Club in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan is home to 13 Olympic figure skaters from five different nations that are currently competing at the Olympic Winter Games in Sochi, Russia.

Within the Detroit Skating Club, Beaumont has a sports therapy clinic that has provided care to these Olympic athletes in their preparation for the Olympic Games. Elite level figure skaters train on average five hours per day, six days per week, year round. The intense training regimen combined with the inherent demands of the sport on the athlete’s body often lead to overuse injuries. As a Beaumont physical therapist, I partner with a certified athletic trainer, Jennifer Taylor,  to help these athletes return to the ice as quickly as possible.

The jumps, spins, footwork and partnering elements performed by figure skaters require a high degree of precision. As a result, alterations in technique secondary to injury and lost training can be detrimental to the athlete. Our job is to quickly assess the skater’s injury, determine what aspect of training may be the cause of the injury and create a back to sport plan that will allow the skater to return to the ice as quickly as possible. Treatment of the Olympic athlete involves ongoing communication between the therapist and the skater so that rehab techniques facilitate the back to sport process. We often need to develop padding systems to relieve pressure from the skating boots or find sports tapping methods to relieve pain that do not restrict movement or interfere with the skater’s ability to perform elements on the ice.

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3-year-old making remarkable progress; draws strength from family

AzariaAzaria came into the world on Halloween in 2010. Maurice and Mayna, Azaria’s biological aunt and uncle, have cared for her since her birth, providing a loving home and seeing to the little girl’s every need. Her name means “helped by God.”

“She has been a blessing to our home and we can’t imagine life without her,” Mayna says.

But, Azaria’s early years have not been without complications.

Just weeks after her birth, she was diagnosed with bronchopulmonary dysplasia, a serious lung condition. A few weeks later, at two months of age, Azaria was diagnosed with an extremely rare 5q11 chromosomal translocation and familial adenomatous polyposis, a hereditary disease associated with the development of colon cancer. At age 1, doctors diagnosed her with chronic lung disease and at age 2, a seizure disorder.

This combination of diagnoses caused severe developmental delays and left Azaria unable to interact with her parents.

While life hasn’t always been easy, her parents are pleased to report Azaria is making remarkable progress with the help of her Beaumont Children’s Hospital doctors.

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10 superfoods for under $15

So you’ve heard of superfoods – but how can you buy healthy foods without breaking the bank? Never fear! We’ve got a roundup of 10 superfoods for under $15:

Beans

SuperfoodsOne of the cheapest superfoods available is also one of the most delicious: beans. The humble bean is high in protein, antioxidants, and fiber – meaning you’ll stay full for longer. Cut calories without feeling deprived with a spicy dip (with black beans), a crisp salad (with white or garbanzo beans), or a hearty chili (with any combination of beans you can imagine!). Garbanzo and white beans can even be pureed and combined with traditionally fatty favorites like mashed potatoes or ricotta cheese for a lower-calorie option that doesn’t sacrifice taste. Add 2 cans of beans to your cart for between $1-2.

Kale

This superfood is favored both by nutritionists and trendy high-end eateries. Kale is full of fiber, calcium, and heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids which support your body’s natural detox system. Kale is also a great source of potassium, iron, and manganese, as well as vitamins A, C, and K. This hearty green pairs with just about anything, but it especially shines with sweet potato, lemon, or garlic. Whether dressed in a beautiful salad, added to a veggie frittata, or simply sautéed in olive oil, kale is as easy to prepare as it is on your wallet. Add 1 bunch of kale to your cart (about 2-4 cups, depending) for under $1.

Sweet Potatoes

Replacing your usual white potatoes with their orange, sugary-fleshed cousins will not only save you calories and carbs, but introduce more fiber – and color! – into your meal. Regular potatoes clock in at twice the starch levels as the same serving of sweet potatoes. Bonus round: sweet potatoes get their rich orange hue from beta-carotene, the same chemical compound found in carrots—good for vision, immunity, and overall health. Roast sweet potatoes whole, or add to pastas, grain salads, omelets, and more. Sweet potato hash browns make any breakfast better! Add 2 sweet potatoes (about 2 pounds) to your cart for less than $1.

Eggs

One egg will cost you 70 calories and about 20 cents – not bad for a food that’s loaded with protein, vision-enhancing antioxidants, and choline, a vitamin shown to promote brain health. Scrambled, poached, or hard-boiled, an egg is a great way to start your day (or end it!). Mix with veggies and greens for a wholesome omelet or frittata, or top plain scrambled eggs with salsa, onion, and avocado for a Mexican-inspired meal. Most of the health benefits of the egg are in their yolks – so stick to 7 whole eggs or fewer each week to keep cholesterol in check. Add 1 dozen eggs to your cart for $2.

Oatmeal

This old standby gets a bad rap for being too boring – but come breakfast time, you won’t find better than this protein-packed grain! Oatmeal is one of the highest natural sources of soluble fiber, which keeps blood sugar from rising too quickly and can help rid the body of excess cholesterol. Rolled oats are packed with inflammation-reducing flavonoids, not to mention zinc, magnesium and iron – essential minerals that boost your immune system. Jazz up your morning oats with fresh fruit, cinnamon, and honey; or, try substituting rolled oats in your favorite baked goods and breaded meats. Add 1 box of rolled oats to your cart for $2.

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5 Ways to Train Like an Olympic Athlete

5 Ways To TrainThe 2014 Winter Games are underway in Sochi. Have you ever wondered how an Olympic athlete trains and prepares for their shot at a gold medal? James Bicos, M.D., Orthopedic Surgeon & Sports Medicine Specialist; consulting physician for the USA Olympic Gymnastics team and Barry Franklin, Ph.D., Director of Cardiac Rehabilitation share five tips on training like the world’s best athletes:

1. Set a goal and stick with it. “For many Olympic athletes, this is a lifetime of work for them. It consisted of setting goals, meeting those goals, and then setting new ones to aspire to be the best,” says Dr. Bicos. You can do this with all parts of your life. Just remember that not reaching your goal is NOT a failure. Evaluate what happened, make changes and try again!

2. Be healthy! The saying “We are what we eat” has some truth to it.  Stay away from fatty foods, junk food and caffeinated/carbonated beverages. Don’t rely on fad diets – if it is too good to be true, it probably is.  You are better off eating a well-rounded diet, coupled with a good exercise regimen.

3. See your physician! Endurance exercise, especially when vigorous, is a double-edged sword: it both protects against and can trigger cardiac events. Cardiac events are likely triggered by undetected cardiovascular disease, most notably, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy or clogged coronary arteries. Both of these abnormalities can often be detected via appropriate screenings, such as those being offered by the new Beaumont Cardiovascular Performance Clinic.

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How do I know when my child is getting the flu? | Ask a Beaumont Doctor

by Nicholas Gilpin, D.O., chief, Infectious Disease, Beaumont Hospital, Grosse Pointe

Ask A Beaumont Doctor, GilpinWith flu season at its peak, children are at higher risk for getting sick because their immune systems are not fully developed.

How do I know when my child is getting the flu?

Influenza is a virus that primarily affects the respiratory system, so the most common symptoms include runny or stuffy nose, sore throat and cough. Your child also may have severe fatigue, body aches, fever and chills. During the winter, these symptoms should always raise one’s suspicion for the flu.

What kind of care should I give my child with the flu?

For most healthy children, the best treatment for the flu is supportive care, including rest. Parents should give their child lots of fluids and give them anti-inflammatory medications to control fever and body aches.

What is the difference between a virus, cold and flu?

Both the common cold and influenza are a type of viral infection. The common cold is caused by a number of different viruses, including the rhinovirus. The flu is caused by the influenza virus. Colds are usually less severe and don’t last as long as the flu. Common colds also are rarely associated with the more severe symptoms of the flu, such as fever, chills and severe fatigue.

Who needs a flu shot and how young can a person be to get a flu shot?

Remembering who should be vaccinated is simple: all people over age 6 months should get a flu shot. There are a few different varieties of influenza vaccination available, so it is best to discuss with your doctor or pharmacist which is best for your child.

Do flu shots protect my child against all the strains out there?

No vaccine is 100 percent effective, but the shots are very effective at preventing influenza and its complications. Most of the flu this season is the H1N1 influenza virus, and the best news is that this virus is covered by all available influenza vaccines.

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When to be concerned about headaches in children

by Elizabeth Leleszi, M.D., pediatric neurologist, medical director of the Beaumont Children’s Hospital Headache Center

It’s one of the statements a parent never wants to hear from a child: “Mom, I have a headache.” What should you do when a headache strikes?

headache_center_lelesziHeadaches are a common source of complaints for children. At the Beaumont Children’s Hospital Headache Center, parents and caregivers tells us that many questions race through their minds when their child complains of a headache. They wonder how best to treat them and worry that something could seriously be wrong.

At what point does my child’s headache warrant a trip to the doctor? Could it be a brain tumor? How much is too much pain medication? And am I using it too frequently? What can I do to treat my child’s headache at home?

You should consider seeing your child’s doctor if the headache:

  • starts after your child hits his or her head
  • awakens your child from sleep at night
  • is accompanied by a high fever (greater than 100.4 F) and other signs of infection, such as a stiff neck, vomiting, difficulty with walking, changes in vision or confusion

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Dancing to Make a Difference | Dance Marathon at the University of Michigan

by Lauren Sofen, PT,  pediatric physical therapist, Beaumont Children’s Hospital

DMUM

Showcasing my dance moves at     DMUM 2013.

Dance Marathon at the University of Michigan (DMUM) is the largest student organization on campus, raising funds and awareness for pediatric rehabilitation.

Dance Marathon at the University of Michigan improves the quality of life for children with disabilities by:

  • developing relationships between college students and participating families
  • raising funds in a creative and energetic manner to support pediatric rehabilitation programs
  • educating the campus and community about our cause

DMUM has been a staple funding source to the Center for Children’s Rehabilitation at Beaumont Children’s Hospital for the past 16 years and is in fact one of the reasons I work at Beaumont today. I joined the Beaumont team in September as a pediatric physical therapist, after a decade away from metro Detroit. During my time away I worked in some of the leading hospitals in the world, in a variety of settings including completing a pediatric residency in Philadelphia, but there was always something missing…

I was working with top physicians, the latest technology and an international population of patients, but I was missing the aspect of my job that got me passionate about PT in the first place – there were no programs to improve kids’ skills and well-being outside of the clinic atmosphere. DMUM provides funding for equipment and a wide variety of special therapeutic programs that go on throughout the year at a significantly discounted rate for families. This discounted rate is most notable because these programs are supplementary and not covered by insurance.

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The Healthy Guide to Valentine’s Day

Healthy Guide to Valentine's DayThis Valentine’s Day, skip the standard dinner for two in favor of a more unique celebration of your love – and burn a few calories in the process! Follow our guide to a healthy, active day sure to sweep your sweetheart off their feet.

Breakfast in bed

Start the day right with a deliciously filling breakfast to energize you both for the day ahead. And what better way to eat breakfast than in bed? Surprise your sweetie with a beautiful spread of fresh fruit, warm cinnamon-maple oatmeal and an egg white omelet stuffed with spinach, tomato, and caramelized onion. Top with avocado for a creamy, dairy-free alternative to calorie-laden cheese.

Take a hike

Resist the urge to crawl back into bed after that delicious breakfast (or don’t—kissing burns 2-5 calories a minute!). Take your loved one on a cozy morning hike through the woods. Bundle up, bring a camera and be sure to pack a water bottle and a healthy snack – almonds, dried fruit, or a homemade granola bar – just in case. Hold hands while you hike and enjoy the solace with your sweetheart!

Have a picnic

It might be cold outside, but that’s no reason you can’t enjoy a picnic lunch! Bring a bit of summer inside with a picnic blanket on the living room floor. Enjoy conversation and quality time with your loved one over peanut butter sandwiches on whole wheat bread and carrot sticks, just like the picnics you enjoyed as a child – plus a glass of red wine for a heart-healthy, romantic twist.

Break a sweat

After lunch, commit to a healthy adventure with your valentine. Go for a spin at your local ice rink – or hit a few balls at the indoor batting cages. Mini-golf, go-karting and even laser tag are all great activities to keep the two of you moving – and laughing – all day. For the active couple, try a unique exercise class together, like kickboxing, rock climbing or aerial yoga. Celebrate your relationship by creating new experiences you’ll treasure for years to come.

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8 Steps to a Better Breakfast

8 Steps to a Better BreakfastWe all know breakfast is the most important meal of the day – but we don’t always have time to devote to elaborate morning meals. Whatever you do, don’t skip it; not eating breakfast can lead to overeating later in the day. A good breakfast provides energy and sets the stage for healthy decisions all day long. Try out these 8 tips for a better breakfast:

1. Fresh fruit

Fresh fruit is as simple to prepare as it is good for you. Mix up your everyday apple or orange routine with lightly caramelized grapefruit  or fresh blackberries over plain non-fat greek yogurt (for protein and calcium), drizzled with honey and raw almonds.

2. Go for grains

Eating a hearty, filling breakfast will make you less inclined to overindulge later in the day. Try oats, farro, quinoa, or even polenta for a protein-packed meal – the perfect foundation for a yummy breakfast. Overnight oatmeal can be assembled well in advance and left to firm up in the fridge, leaving you with a quick, ready-to-eat meal come morning.

3. Homemade is always better

Pre-packaged granola bars are certainly convenient for grab-and-go meals, but most store-bought bars are full of unnecessary sugars. Cut back on calories with delicious, no-bake bar recipes that can be easily assembled on the weekend to get you out the door on time all week. 

4. How about a milkshake?

Yes, you heard that correctly – a chocolate milkshake can be a perfectly healthy breakfast option, when made with frozen bananas! Blend up bananas with cocoa powder and a splash of milk for a deliciously creamy breakfast you’d swear is dessert. Add peanut butter or unsweetened coconut for an extra special treat.

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